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Subway says no homeschoolers allowed

By May 26, 2008

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I often report on contests that our children can enter that will contribute to their education by writing a paper or doing research or a project of some sort. Not this time. I'm sorry to say that Subway has chosen to exclude homeschooled children from their creative writing contest.
"NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. Contest is open only to legal residents of the Untied States who are currently over the age of 18 and have children who attend elementary, private or parochial schools that serve grades PreK-6. No home schools will be accepted."
Why did Subway choose to discriminate against homeschoolers in this manner? I think it was an error in judgement on their part. The errors in the contest material itself indicate a lack of forethought and planning and makes me wonder who will be judging this contest. Many homeschoolers are boycotting both Subway and Scholastic Books.

Comments

May 26, 2008 at 3:58 am
(1) Pam Devine says:

I’m entering the contest and leaving my thoughts on their bad judgement. I will boycote Subway and I’m happy to say I don’t use Scholastic Books.

May 26, 2008 at 5:52 am
(2) Dawn says:

I’m not boycotting Subway. they have every right to limit who can enter their contests and it’s pretty clear that this one is meant to target schools (1st prize is supposed to go to a school).

Would people think it was discrimination against public school kids if Subways was running a contest limited to homeschoolers with homeschooling curriculum as first prize?

May 26, 2008 at 6:32 am
(3) Vicki says:

I agree they have a right to determine who enters but I have a right to spend my money with businesses that support homeschoolers. Their contest didn’t have to target schools. There were many options for arranging this to include all children. It was deliberately arranged to benefit the school system.

And however unlikely it would be for them to run a contest for homeschoolers, yes, I’d say that was wrong, too. Why not just have a contest for all children with a prize that any child could use?

May 26, 2008 at 8:20 am
(4) Carrie says:

Maybe they should include homeschoolers, since in the entry/application form, they missspelled the word “Basket”. Possibly the author was a product of the public schools?

May 26, 2008 at 12:21 pm
(5) Sunniemom says:

I agree with Dawn, but I also grant that excluding homeschoolers has had repercussions that Subway never considered, which does not make good business sense. I mean, they didn’t even proofread their own ad. Who thunk this thing up anyway, KWIM?

And how many homeschoolers would have entered this contest if it was open to them? I feel like some folks are protesting just to raise a ruckus about something they would not have been interested in until they realized they were being ‘excluded’.

May 26, 2008 at 1:59 pm
(6) alli@homex3 says:

As a homeschooler commenting… I guess it is a free country. Subway can chose to leave us out if they want. And we can choose to homeschool if we want. It is their loss, though. This will leave a bad taste in my mouth towards them, even if not purposely making me pick another restaurant during a lunch break, which we do take daily together, unlike kids who attend school. Subway should know that our homeschool school has 200 or so members, and we can use books to share as well. Good luck to all who enter, maybe some of those books will end up on ebay and we homeschoolers can get them for a deal.
Sincerely, homeschool Mom in CA

May 26, 2008 at 11:34 pm
(7) LC says:

Why doesn’t Subway have two contests, one for public and one for homeschoolers? They could have changed the prize to suit either one if they really wanted. They obviously care about kids learning, and nutrition! (please note the sarcasm) – homeschooling mom

May 26, 2008 at 11:59 pm
(8) Paula Hornback says:

I have left messages with both companies congratulating them for obviously all having normal public school children. And thanked them for helping my daughter with her already self-esteem problem for being special needs. Will definately boycott both!!

May 27, 2008 at 8:12 am
(9) Lala says:

I could be wrong but I really do think that Subway just didn’t think this one through. It just made sense to them that this didn’t apply to home school students. Little did they know how sensitive & vocal we are!

May 27, 2008 at 8:32 am
(10) angie wood says:

They can do what they want. However they will probably realize what they have done when they have lost lots of customers. I have boycotted Subway for a year now. My family of six went into our local Subway to eat after a baseball game. It was 9:15 and the sign said they closed at 9:30. After we purchased the sandwiches they told us we had to leave because they were about to close! I was extremely upset. So we choose not to go back to Subway!!

May 27, 2008 at 8:51 am
(11) Maureen says:

How can you teach children and avoid all Scholastic books?

But, on another point. Is it just the passage above that is making me see this, but it appears that “public school” children are excluded. It says “private or parochial.”

May 27, 2008 at 9:05 am
(12) Antonia says:

Through what channels is this contest advertised? In the Subway stores, or in the public schools? (I have not heard of it, and I have one child in a private school.) Subway may be spineless; however, I suspect the discrimination is imposed by Scholastic, whose core customer bases are public and private schools, and libraries. There are many companies/events that explicitly exclude homeschoolers. This prohibition is nothing new. Not right, perhaps, but definitely not new.

May 27, 2008 at 9:15 am
(13) Betty says:

I think that Subway just didn’t think it through or do their research well. They were probably thinking that a grand prize to just one family of homeschoolers wouldn’t benefit as many children as would a prize to a school group.

Not that that is any excuse! Had they done their homework, they would have found that many homeschool organizations exist to serve large groups of children.

Now, Scholastic, on the other hand, has a huge vested interest in the education industry. This is business as usual for them. Don’t expect them to think outside their own nine dots — they need to protect #1.

May 27, 2008 at 9:27 am
(14) Rebecca Miller says:

I’m not sure if writing to complain is the ideal answer as much as writing to “educate” them would be (and I wrote both Scholastic and
Subway). I think that companies such as this look at homeschoolers as just individuals and not as part of groups, such as co-ops. If a
homeschooler won, they are in a much better position to have options with winning something such as this: donate to their co-op that they participate with; donate to
All Children’s Hospital; donate to Make-A-Wish foundation, or even donate the equipment to their local public school for example.
For my kids, it’s not always about the “prize” as much as the competition, the chance to win or win, the certificate, etc. If they get something that they just can’t use, then they pass it on rather
than let it be wasted. (Not tht $5000 in P.E. equipment wouldn’t be nice, but I don’t know that we could really use it.)

Secondly, I agree that it may not have been a financially smart move for the company. I have been reading about this exclusion through posts in a ton of groups that
I am in, which means that it is gathering momentum. Several groups pushing a boycott of Subway (but what about Scholastic?). I would have thought that a more equal type of prize, one that would have allowed all children to participate, would have been the wiser.

Last, let’s not forget that time to enjoy the equipment is being drastically cut in the public schools (in our areas anyway). Nice new
equipment with little time to utilize and enjoy it: need more time in class to prepare for state required tests.

I think that whoever came up with such a prize was definately ill-informed to many sides of homeschooling. I also think that they are behind the times with what (public) schools are really wanting: equipment to use in the classroom to use for test preparation/practice [computers, for example).

In a way, you have feel sorry that Subway may help you to get skinny, but they don’t really have the skinny on things going on.

That’s just MHO is essentially what I wrote to them.

Rebecca Miller

May 27, 2008 at 9:27 am
(15) Betty says:

P.S.
For more information on the gigantic education industry, read John Taylor Gatto’s books this summer! Especially — The Underground History of American Education.

May 27, 2008 at 9:39 am
(16) Mrs. H says:

I would recommend to Subway and Scholastic that future events could have a stipulation that allowed a Homeschool Group or Co-op to “enter” their contest as the prize recipients.
As far as Scholastic goes…they now offer their book flyers to homeschool families and homeschool groups for purchasing inexpensive books and earning rewards for your homeschool. They ARE attempting to reach out to homeschoolers. :) Its a start.

May 27, 2008 at 9:39 am
(17) Katie says:

I belong to a Yahoo homeschool group and there were many different reactions to this. One person contacted Scholastic, and this is the portion of Scholastic’s response that she posted: “…We are deeply sorry if the Subway contest has offended you and thank you for voicing your concern. Our intention was never to make independent schooled children feel discriminated against or excluded from this specific promotion.
Throughout the course of the year Scholastic runs a number of contests and
sweepstakes that are open to all teachers and students. The eligibility of this
contest in particular was solely put in place to award a large group of children
with the grand prize of $5,000 worth of athletic equipment. We do however
understand how home-schooled children could benefit from this type of prizing
and will make sure eligibility is open to everyone in future promotions.”

We truly appreciate your feedback and will make sure a similar situation does
not happen again”

May 27, 2008 at 10:15 am
(18) Antonia says:

The suggestion that homeschool co-op groups might satisfy a requirement for “group” or “collective” status seems a good and fair idea. It won’t help families who are excluded from their nearby homeschool groups for whatever reason (religion, in my family’s case). But it is a great solution for the majority of homeschoolers, people who do enjoy group status!

May 27, 2008 at 10:37 am
(19) Elizabeth says:

I have a hard time believing that this was an oversight. Were this program designed to encourage literacy and physical fitness that is so lacking in institutional educational facilities, their responses would state as such, and it would be posted on the site as being their intention. IF literacy in these places WERE a major concern, they would have included educational materials in the main prize category. IF this were not a slap against Homeschooling, they would have offered alternative prizes or concurrent contests. Yes, it is true that they are free to choose whom they will allow. But, we must remember that every action has a reaction. If you are going to do something, you must be ready for whatever consequences of your actions. There is no real reason to exclude homeschool children, other than having a bias against them.

If the concern was of the deterioration of quality in education and literacy….why do they not offer educational materials for the school of the winning entry? There are many things that a homeschooler could do with the larger prize, such as donating it to a local community center, or a group homeschooling facility, or hundreds of other options.

Many homeschooling parents search out competitions for their children…such as the national spelling and geography bees or the Leggo Electronics competition. Even Nasa has a program for homeschoolers, so…why exclude?

May 27, 2008 at 11:32 am
(20) Ann Adair says:

The saddest thing about the whole entry form is that they misspelled United States. I’m not sure anyone can legally enter since it’s open only to “legal residents of the Untied States…”

Who will be judging these essays?

In case anyone is wondering or cares, I believe Subway can open its contest to anyone it wants. I still like Subway and hope that somebody I know wins it for their school. That would be a small shiny spot in their public school experience. Considering that my kids can use our excellent YMCA facilities any time they like in our homeschooling schedule, we neither want nor need the prize offered for this competition.

The unfortunate aspect of this competition is that it’s proving to be an opportunity for some homeschooling parents to show their kids what jackasses they can be and how socially obnoxious some homeschoolers can be. The rest of us despise this and must spend time defending ourselves trying to “undo” the stereotype of school haters this behavior perpetuates. Perhaps these people would have a better outcome if they wrote letters to their government about No Child Left Behind.

Good luck to all of the participants!

May 27, 2008 at 11:38 am
(21) Het says:

Subway did issue an appology to homeschoolers. However, we as homeschoolers need to be careful not to play the “victim” in everything. The contest was for a large group/school. Yes, that amount would be benificial to a homeschooler, however, a homeschooled family isn’t nearly as large as public and private schools. It makes perfect sense. Boycotting and complaining at everything doesn’t really help. We need to pick our “battles” and be wise. Not so jumpy and defensive. That’s how the rest of the world may respond and act about things, but that doesn’t mean that we have too.

I will post the appology issued by Subway.

May 27, 2008 at 11:39 am
(22) Het says:

Here is an apology and explanation from subway posted on another group:

Regarding your concerns about the Subway contest that excludes home
schools from contest eligibility, Scholastic and Subway apologize to
all individuals who have taken offense at this. Our intention was
never to make independent schooled children feel discriminated
against or excluded from this specific promotion.

Throughout the course of the year Scholastic runs a number of
contests and sweepstakes that are open to all teachers and students.
The eligibility of this contest in particular was solely put in place
to award a large group of children with the grand prize of $5,000
worth of athletic equipment. We do however understand how home-
schooled children could benefit from this type of prizing and will
make sure eligibility is open to everyone in future promotions.

We appreciate your feedback and will make sure a similar situation
does not happen in the future.

If anyone has any additional comments to make regarding this contest,
please email Scholastic directly at P&Cconnects@ scholastic. com and we
will respond promptly to your concerns. Other email addresses or
phone numbers shown in this blog will not reach individuals who are
equipped to help you. Again, please direct all comments/inquiries to
P&Cconnects@ scholastic. com and we would be more than happy to speak
with you regarding this.

Thank you!

May 27, 2008 at 12:09 pm
(23) Helena says:

As I have read through these comments and others from groups I belong to, one thought continued to go through my mind. We, as home schoolers, must not look at everything as a potential, intentional slight. We have made our informed choice to home school our children and, thereby, direct their education in whatever direction we feel led.

As parents, my husband and I learned very early to choose the battles we really want to win and not to make every issue with our children a battle! The same principle should be applied to home schooling and the world arena. Every issue out there does not predicate a battle. Now, here is California, the anti-spanking bill (which was recently defeated due to it not getting out of the Assembly) is a battle that every parent (home schooling or not) needed to get involved in. The recent CA Court decision about home schooling was another that necessitated immediate action. But, a private company setting boundaries as to who can and can’t enter and win — I don’t think so!

As far as boycotting these companies, again — is it worth it? Now there are companies that support immoral issues (i.e., homosexuality) that it is worth boycotting them and letting them know why they are being boycotted. All this boycott will accomplish is to label the home school community as a bunch of whiners! What would any of us do with all that sports equipment! My husband wouldn’t let it sit in our garage. Who would administrate who uses it when? Who is going to police how it is used by whom?

Come on people — use your boycott, political and vocal powers for issues that really matter and stop taking issue with everything!

May 27, 2008 at 1:16 pm
(24) Heather says:

It looks like no one in the United States can enter as according to there own rules, only legal residents of the Untied States can enter.

That spelling mistake aside, I am glad they offered an apology and I hope they change their ways in future contests.

I will not be boycoting Subway. I don’t eat there anyway, so there is no reason for me to. I got sick the few times I have ate there.

May 27, 2008 at 1:33 pm
(25) Angela says:

I think that Subway made a very bad choice. Personally, I don’t like Subway anyway. As far as Scholastic, my kids were members of a couple of their book clubs that were sent to the house. I recieved a letter a couple weeks ago that they are no longer supporting those clubs because they are focusing on schools only. It is a big mistake if you ask me. I had my homeschool registered with Scholastic, and I deleted my account. It is ridiculous the way that they are treating homeschoolers.

I have a feeling that Subway’s decision was more based on Scholastic then Subway itself.

May 27, 2008 at 1:43 pm
(26) Doreen says:

I agree with the others that advise homeschooling parents to choose their battles wisely. I belong to several internet-based homeschool groups, and I just have to say that I’ve never seen such sensitive, quick-to-point-the-finger-of-blame perpetuators of victimhood in my life.

I choose to homeschool my child because I don’t believe in, and choose not to participate in, institutional education. I believe my child can be better educated by me. However, whining about every little slight, whether real or imagined, is not TEACHING my child anything but how to moan and groan and grow up to be a victim, too.

How about taking all the energy used to “boycott” Subway or Scholastic(who have every right to aim their contests at specific groups) and putting it in a more useful place. Surely there are legal and moral battles worth fighting out there that have a real and lasting impact on people. With the possible exception of the winners who will think of the contest every time they use the athletic equipment, absolutely no one’s life will be forever altered by this contest.

A better idea is to take that energy and spend it on educating your children about the inevitable inequities they will encounter in their lifetimes. Teach them that they are not “entitled” to everything and being excluded from something so trivial as a contest is does NOT make them a victim.

Homeschoolers such as myself that are trying to earn respect rather than be considered the lunatic fringe don’t appreciate this constant bellyaching about every little thing.

I have seen people fly off the handle and become totally outraged at things that weren’t accurate, nevermind worth getting all steamed up over. I’ve seen people who have only heard one side of a story go whinging off on a tirade about boycotts or letter-writing campaigns or some other such thing only to find out that the side of the story they heard was WRONG.

Take it easy, people. Life is too short to waste precious time and energy on things like this. Your children will thank you for it someday.

May 27, 2008 at 2:15 pm
(27) Lia says:

To those parents who realize the severity of discriminating a group of children, keep on boycotting the international companies who are promoting this.

This has nothing to do with what the prize is or how a homeschooler could use it. That is pretty arrogant for these parents to assume that their child would win in the first place to rationalize away the discrimination to their children.

There are many different communities that have a homeschooling gym and have to rent gym floors or that utilize their local YMCA’s. There are homeschoolers that have to rent gym time, pay for uniforms, ref fees, bus rental for traveling games, and much more. This equipment could have been donated to any public gym. That excuse for discrimination has been over played and dead now.

If this discrimination was directed toward a different group of people, like a certain race or a gender, people would be all over this. But because so many parents rationalize away the prize and not see the principal of this, by being the voice for their children who obviously can’t, this discrimination will contuine.

Today it is Subway,an international company, tomorrow, what multi-million dollar company will discriminate against you?

To those who see nothing wrong with this, sit back and contuine to do nothing. But when another company joins in and discriminates against your child, you can’t complain because you did nothing to aid in stopping it.

To the other parents who care and want to protect their childrens values, ethics and opportunities, please sign the petition below.
http://www.petitiononline.com/home777/petition.html

May 27, 2008 at 2:26 pm
(28) D says:

People – this is NOT discrimination! Please get a grip on yourselves. What if the contest was for 8 – 12 year olds only? Would you boycott because your 14 year old can’t participate? Is THAT discrimination?

Good grief. What is this country coming to?

May 27, 2008 at 2:32 pm
(29) Sigh says:

You are quite mistaken if you believe that an online petition makes a difference at all. It’s the epitome of slacktivism.

May 27, 2008 at 4:39 pm
(30) Anita Wallace says:

Thank goodness this was not a spelling contest! With such gross spelling errors in the guidelines (Untied States & bastket) I would worry about the judging. I have written a letter to Subway Corporate Offices and I urge you to do the same.
~ Anita Wallace

May 27, 2008 at 5:53 pm
(31) Anastasia Gusev says:

I am homeschooled and I love to compete, either win or lose. When I read this I thought to myself, “No Fair, that cannot be right” but I got the HSLDA newsletter and it said the same. This isn’t fair. Are they out of there minds? I bet there are more homeschoolers than Public kids that would sign up for this….I think that Subway is just scared that we homeschoolers and going to kick butt!!! he-he we are to cool!
I do hope they change their mind because I don’t want people to look at them the wrong way. God Bless! A homeschool student.

May 27, 2008 at 6:15 pm
(32) Skyla says:

A couple of points:
“A better idea is to take that energy and spend it on educating your children about the inevitable inequities they will encounter in their lifetimes. Teach them that they are not “entitled” to everything and being excluded from something so trivial as a contest is does NOT make them a victim.”
1 )Yes, there are ‘inevitable inequities’ in life and I choose to teach my children how to recognize and resolve those inequities- not roll over and accept them. Having the sense to recognize REAL discrimination and the courage to question it is not the same as a feeling of entitlement! Standing up for yourself IS the antidote to feeling like a victim.
(Also- the contest is only ‘trivial’ if you don’t want to participate or are not the one being excluded.)

2) To the people who posted that it is ‘silly’ or ‘ineffectual’ to boycott a company that does business in a way that bothers you…Shame on you! Every patriotic American knows that MONEY is what this country cares about! *note sarcasm*
Our government is more concerned with getting our money for war than educating our kids. The school systems are more concerned with getting money from Pepsi, Frito Lay, etc than the nutritional health of our kids. Scholastic certainly cares more about their bottom line than the literacy of our children. So, yes, not giving them any of my money DOES make a difference…especially when I am 1 of 5000 or more people who stop buying anything from Scholastic or Subway. More importantly than the impact I make on the companies is what boycotting those companies teaches my children. It teaches them to stand up for themselves in a non-violent and intelligent manner. It teaches them that no matter how big the bad guy is- a handful of small good guys CAN make a difference!
My last point is the one that scares me the most…how can anyone argue that this is not discrimination?…did you check the dictionary?…do you even know what discrimination means?…let me help you.
“~as a noun~
treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit: racial and religious intolerance and discrimination.”

So, yes, opening a contest for 8-12 year olds IS discrimination because you have chosen a very specific target category that automatically excludes anyone not in that category. As adults (or do I need to specify rational adults with any modicum of common sense?) we decide what is ‘acceptable’ discrimination. We do this on an individual basis and we do this together as a culture. Our culture discriminates against children being in bars and lounges. Another way of saying this is that we judiciously differentiate between the appropriateness of a 15 year old drinking whiskey and a 45 year old drinking whiskey. We, as a society, discriminate against underage drinking because science and experience have proven it to be undeniably unhealthy and even dangerous.
I, as an individual, discriminate against fast food. I boycott all fast food chains because I personally believe they are feeding us legal poison. Both of these are acceptable forms of discrimination, these discriminations are both made to protect our kids. The first we can all agree on- alcohol is bad for our kids and we all work together to keep them from being exposed too early or too much. The second isn’t something we all agree on, but my discrimination doesn’t affect or hinder your ability or opportunity to eat McDonalds. Therefore, my assertion that these are acceptable forms of discrimination.
Then we have obviously inappropriate forms of discrimination. Not hiring someone because they are black or fat or old is something we all have agreed is objectionable. Having stated that, I have to immediately back-pedal because there are definitely people still narrow-minded, ignorant and hateful enough to think it’s ok not to hire someone because of the color of their skin. So, the sane and educated people of this country actually passed legislation, pushed their representatives into action and made it unlawful to discriminate for those reasons.
That didn’t happen overnight, though! It started with a small group of higher minded people who had the courage and follow-through to protest and make noise about it. Doreen called us “sensitive, quick-to-point-the-finger-of-blame perpetuators of victimhood” a few posts back. Well, Doreen, we are also called revolutionists, insurgents, fanatics, rebels and we are the ones who change the world for the better! People who sit on their hands and do nothing are not the easy-going diplomats they so often see themselves as…they are the apathetic fat cats blocking the way of progress.
I mean, if you hear that hundreds or thousands of families are affected negatively by something- why would your immediate response be to belittle their concerns and demean their efforts to better their situation? Why wouldn’t you encourage them in the efforts they make for equality and support the actions they take to give their kids some equality too?…
Really, what is this country coming to!?!

May 27, 2008 at 6:39 pm
(33) Skyla says:

Oh, and one more point to ‘Sigh’, who posted,

“You are quite mistaken if you believe that an online petition makes a difference at all. It’s the epitome of slacktivism.”

Actually, I think your impassive and totally phlegmatic observation of how little everyone else is doing takes first prize for slacktivism!

May 27, 2008 at 8:35 pm
(34) Cheryce says:

I think it’s becoming more obvious that there are more and more homeschool families out there.And we are being recognized in many ways. But companies out there have the right to omit whomever they choose. I think there are plenty of good opportunities out there for those of us who home school. I agree with what one of the ladies said they could make it open to all kids ages and make the prize something that all kids could use. But if they don’t it’s not the end of the world for us homeschoolers, comapanies should have the right to do something great for kids without the backlash from certain groups. Let’s pick our battles folks, and let’s be a possitive example for our children. We will have plenty of examples to let our home schooled children “Shine”, give the public schools their moment.

May 27, 2008 at 10:51 pm
(35) heather says:

I am going to keep my comment short. I am also a mom who homeschools. I found it very upsetting to read. I understand that the ‘prize’ is geared toward more of what a school would use. Thinking further on it though, what equipment could an elementary school need aside from parachutes and balls anyway. I know that many homeschool orginizations and support groups also have two or three classes a week held in a church or building that could very well handle the equipment for the homeschool children to all use. Just a thought. I do not feel having ‘seperate’ cntests would be necessary or fair either. I think all students should have an equal oppertunity. I signed the petition a few days ago to boycott them. I feel it is unfair and discriminatory.

May 28, 2008 at 8:44 am
(36) Maureen says:

Heather, in your sentence it should have been “their” not “there.” I figured since so many of you are picking on typos on Subway’s guidelines, then it’s only fair to point out yours.

May 28, 2008 at 3:07 pm
(37) Amanda says:

Well, I don’t understand WHY a parent who homeschools (thus, EXCLUDING their child from formal education) would care to INCLUDE their children in something not intended for them? TRUST me, there are TONS of things aimed strictly toward homeschoolers. Get over it, find yet something else ignorant to complain about.. Wait- shouldn’t you be teaching your children right now???

May 28, 2008 at 4:34 pm
(38) Annette says:

Comments have been interesting to read.

“Would people think it was discrimination against public school kids if Subways was running a contest limited to homeschoolers with homeschooling curriculum as first prize?” ~ Yes, I think they would.

“What if the contest was for 8 – 12 year olds only?” ~ As a society we accept this type of discrimination because it evens out the flaying field. If all contests allowed all ages then the 8 y.o. would never win anything. Age discrimination has to do with competing with other kids of a similar ability. But perhaps that is the reason for excluding homeschoolers in this contest. Here in WA there was a push from parents using the public school system, to exclude homeschooled kids from a national science competition. The reason given was that it isn’t fair that homeschooled kids have more free time to work on their projects and therefore have an unfair advantage.

“But companies out there have the right to omit whomever they choose.” ~ Hmmm. Like, No Blacks Allowed, for example? Can’t say that I can get on board with that thought.

“We will have plenty of examples to let our home schooled children “Shine”, give the public schools their moment.” ~ When homeschoolers compete in national contests they go up against kids of all educational backgrounds, but sometimes the homeschoolers should be excluded so that more public schooled kids can win every now and then. Is that what you’re saying? Interesting logic. Can’t say that I’m on board with that one either.

“Surely there are legal and moral battles worth fighting out there that have a real and lasting impact on people… (A)bsolutely no one’s life will be forever altered by this contest.” ~ This is another brick in the wall. If it were the only brick, then yes, I would agree. But it’s not. Before I pulled my kids from public school seven years ago, my two children had won a contest within their school. When we came to collect the awards we were told they didn’t qualify because they no longer attended the school. I asked if the same applied to kids who were merely transferring to another school. After a long pause, the contest coordinator said they could have their awards.

“However, whining about every little slight, whether real or imagined, is not TEACHING my child anything but how to moan and groan and grow up to be a victim, too.” ~ I agree. Whining is about as helpful as nails on a chalkboard. When my kids were young I taught them the best way to not get what they wanted was to whine about it. On the other hand, being articulate and sticking to the facts would get them much closer to their intended goal.

“I agree with the others that advise homeschooling parents to choose their battles wisely.” ~ Me, too. And this is one of those battles. I won’t be organizing any Scholastic book burnings or stalking any Subway employees, of course. Wouldn’t want to be lumped with “the lunatic fringe”. But I will be writing to both companies. I will try to be articulate and stick to the facts. Likely, I will receive a letter of thanks from both companies, expressing their appreciation for my willingness to share information about their customer base. We are, after all, the life blood of their business.

May 28, 2008 at 5:28 pm
(39) Mrs. Taft says:

This is one of the silliest things I’ve ever seen anyone get up in arms about.

May 29, 2008 at 5:24 pm
(40) Nation says:

“Carrie says:
Maybe they should include homeschoolers, since in the entry/application form, they missspelled the word “Basket”. Possibly the author was a product of the public schools?”

Possibly you are a product of the public schools since you misspelled “misspelled”?

May 30, 2008 at 8:30 am
(41) john yeilding says:

Maybe they felt homeschoolers would have an unfair advantage with help from an all too willing parent….ie, the public school classroom keeps things more equal….I’m ok with their decision.

May 30, 2008 at 6:01 pm
(42) Kiasells says:

I don’t know if this is a recent development or not, but I went to the Subway contest website and there is a link that says, “Not part of the public school system? Click Here.” It then gives information on a contest that they are doing just for homeschoolers.

July 9, 2008 at 8:44 am
(43) Jim Bob Howard says:

Dear Beverly,

I wanted to let you know that Subway has revamped their Every Sandwich Tells a Story contest, reintroducing it as a Summer Special, running through August 31. They even took out a banner ad with Homeschooling Today magazine.

For all those who clamored about Subway excluding homeschoolers, now’s the time to show them that we will indeed participate when they include us. The registration form I saw asks for the Child’s School Name, so homeschoolers should make sure they enter something like Smith Family Homeschool, rather than Smith Academy.

The link to the contest is available on http://www.homeschooltoday.com.

Blessings,
Jim Bob

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